Black Lives Matter. Black Literature Matters. Black Art Matters.

The recent murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Tony McDade, and others are a devastating reflection of the racism that runs deep in our communities, in the United States, in the world. Gulf Coast opposes systemic racism, white supremacy, and anti-Black violence in all forms.

Since our founding in 1986 in Houston, Texas—once home to George Floyd and where we continue to operate—our mission has been to reflect our diverse community in the work we publish. We have learned that we can and must do better. One of the great pillars of Houston is the Black community, and we will continue to strive to better represent and raise these often suppressed voices. As James Baldwin said in his Notes of a Native Son, “This world is white no longer, and it will never be white again.”

We commit ourselves to the work of collective liberation through daily action and with an ongoing dedication to honoring Black voices through literature and art. We stand in solidarity with our Black contributors, readers, colleagues, and all Black lives. Black lives matter.

Help us support Black lives through literature and art, as well as efforts for justice in Houston, by donating to or supporting these organizations we compiled on our blog.

Features

How Can Black People Write About Flowers at a Time Like This

Hanif Abdurraqib

Forgive me, for I have been nurturing my well-worn / grudges against beauty. I am hoping my neighbors / will show some mercy on me for backing my car into / the garden & crushing what I will say were the peonies.

2 Poems

Roger Reeves

And did we come to some conclusion about who set fire to the Master’s House / The autumn-petal of it, swinging flame on the black bough of the sky?

From the GC Blog

BLM Resources & Links

Erik Brown

In response to anti-Black racist violence, help us support Black lives through literature and art, as well as efforts for justice in Houston, by donating to or supporting these organizations.

D.A. Powell on "The Mad Place" of Poetry

Justin Jannise

"You can use language and be absolutely true to what you’re saying, and at the same time people have an opportunity to misread it as something scintillating or shocking or surprising."

Engaging the Mystery: The Anagogic Poetry of Lucie Brock-Broido

Eric Farwell

Last March, Lucie Brock-Broido died at the age of 61. She left behind four collections, and the work within was characterized as “spooky,” “haunted,” or some version thereof when she was eulogized in every publication from The New York Times to The Paris…